Sheriff's Office Home
Job Opportunities
Crime of the Week
Civil Process Service Fees
Concealed Permit
Contact Information
Juvenile Services
Inmate Information
Programs
Records Schedule
Victim and Offender Info
VIN & HIN Inspections
Child Restraint
Victim Assistance
Press Releases
Additional Information
Tip of the Week

TIP OF
THE WEEK

From the desk of Lt. Don Hollingshead

Welcome to the Laramie County Sheriff's Department "Tip of the Week" page. Each week we will be bringing you a different tip on topics concerning public safety and how to protect yourself, your family, and your belongings. We hope that you will find the posted tips both useful and informative, and pass them along to friends and family.

Best regards

Lt. Don Hollingshead

Laramie County Sheriff's Department

Date: 4/21/16

SHARING THE ROAD: CYCLISTS AND MOTORISTS

It's the time of year when we start to see more bicycles on the road. More people are using bicycles as a means to commute, for entertainment and for exercise.

Motorists should remember when sharing the road with a cyclist:

  • A bicycle is considered by law to be a vehicle. When a cyclist has stopped and remains astride their bicycle at an intersection and/or for a traffic signal, they are to be treated as a vehicle waiting for their turn to proceed.
  • Many children riding bicycles on the street may lack the necessary training and skills for safe cycling. They may not be aware of all dangers.
  • Be alert for small children on oversized bicycles. This may increase the likelihood for loss of control.
  • When passing a cyclist, go around them like you would any other vehicle. Leave lots of room.
  • When you are preparing to make a right turn, watch for cyclists who may pull up alongside your vehicle. Remember to shoulder-check your blind spots.
  • When you are about to make a right turn, do not pull up beside a cyclist and then turn directly in front of them and cut them off.
  • When pulling away from the curb, always check for cyclists who may be trying to pass you.
  • When parked at the curb, always check for cyclists before you open your vehicle door. It's the driver's responsibility not to open the vehicle door into traffic.
  • Do not follow too close behind cyclists. They do not have brake lights to warn you when they are stopping.
  • Cyclists are entitled to make left turns in the same manner as motorists. Since they are more exposed to traffic on left turns, they will need extra consideration, especially on multi-lane roads.
  • Cyclists are required to ride as close as practicable to the curb, however they may need to ride further out when they have to steer away from drainage grates, pot holes, debris, loose gravel or sand, wet or slippery surfaces, rutted or grooved pavement and even dogs. Be aware of the roadway conditions that may affect a cyclist.
  • Do not sound your horn unnecessarily when you are overtaking a cyclist. It may startle them and cause them to lose control. If you feel that you must use your horn, tap it quickly and lightly while you are still some distance away from the cyclist.

Cyclists should also remember that, when they are riding their bicycles on streets and highways, they are considered by law to be a vehicle. Therefore they are required to obey all the rules of the road, which apply to other (motorized) vehicles, plus those that apply only to bicycle operators.

Cyclists using the streets and highways should:

  • Never ride against traffic. It is one of the leading causes of crashes, accounting for 15% to 20% of all crashes with cars.
  • Keep both hands on the handlebars except when making a hand signal.
  • Keep both feet on the pedals.
  • Not carry more people at one time than the bicycle was designed for.
  • Not hold onto, attach themselves, or attach the bicycle to any other moving vehicle.
  • Only ride side by side on the road with another cyclist when it does not impede other traffic. If traffic doesn't have enough room to pass you safely, ride single file.
  • Ensure the bicycle is equipped with at least one white light to the front and a red light and or red reflector mounted on the rear of the bicycle when riding between sunset and sunrise.
  • Ensure the bicycle has effective brakes.

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to remind everyone to be safe and courteous.

Date: 3/3/16

PREVENTING CREDIT CARD FRAUD

Credit card fraud can happen in a variety of ways, from low tech dumpster diving to high tech hacking. A thief might go through the trash to find discarded billing statements and then use your account information to buy things. A retail or bank website might get hacked, and your card number could be stolen. A dishonest clerk or waiter could take a photo of your credit card. Or maybe you get a call offering a free trip or discounted travel package. But to be eligible, you have to join a club and give your account number, say, to guarantee your place. The next thing you know, charges you didn't make are on your bill, and the trip promoters who called you are nowhere to be found. If you carry a card that contains an older "smart chip," there is a possibility that your information can be stolen using an illicit reader device. The smart chips allow your card to be read without being swiped. The newer smart chips are supposed to have better fraud protection built into them.

Fraud protection practices include:

  • Don't give your account number to anyone on the phone unless you've made the call to a company you know to be reputable. If you've never done business with them before, do an online search first for reviews or complaints.
  • Shred receipts and statements before throwing away.
  • Carry only the card you need for that outing.
  • During a transaction, keep your eye on your card. Make sure you get it back before you walk away.
  • Never sign a blank receipt. Draw a line through any blank spaces above the total.
  • Save your receipts to compare with your statement.
  • Check your account often to make sure the charges match the purchases you've made.
  • Place smart-chip cards in RFID-protective card sleeves, which cost a few dollars.
  • Report any questionable charges to the card issuer.
  • Notify your card issuer if your address changes or if you will be traveling.

Report Losses and Fraud

Call the card issuer as soon as you realize your card has been lost or stolen. Many companies have toll-free numbers and 24 hour service to deal with this. You may also be required to file a report with law enforcement.

Date: 1/27/16

CALLING 911

At some point, most of us will have reason to call for the police, fire department, or an ambulance. Not every call for emergency services necessitates a call to 911. 911 is the emergency number. If you live in Laramie County and your call for service is not an emergency you should call the Combined Communication Center at 307-637-6525. If you are calling with questions for the Sheriff's Office or the Police Department and do not need an officer dispatched to your location you can contact us directly at: SHERIFF'S OFFICE- 1-307-633-4700 or CHEYENNE POliCE DEPARTMENT- 1-307-637-6500. Here are suggestions on when to and when not to call 911. Keep in mind that these are general guidelines and if there is an immediate threat to someone's safety or a property crime in progress, call 911.

REASONS TO CALL 911

  • If you or someone else are in need of emergency medical service.
  • Car accident involving injuries or lane blockage.
  • To report a fire.
  • If you or someone else is in immediate danger.
  • Crimes in progress.
  • Suicidal persons, or any incident involving someone having a dangerous mental or emotional episode.

REASONS NOT TO CALL 911

  • To report a power outage.
  • When you want to find out if someone has been arrested or is in jail.
  • When you are looking for general information or a phone number.
  • When you are curious why there is a police officer or ambulance at the neighbor's house.
  • To find out about weather conditions.
  • To find out about school/business closings.
  • For directions.
  • For a flat tire or if you run out of gas.
  • Power outages, water main breaks, potholes in streets, etc. (These calls should typically go to the appropriate city department and not the police, when possible.)
  • Traffic accidents with property damage only and do not present a serious traffic hazard.
  • Thefts, stolen cars, forgeries, fraud, vandalism, harassment, trespassing, threats, noise disturbances.
  • For loose dogs in the area, unless the dog is trying to attack someone.
  • Complaints on an officer.

Once again, these are merely guidelines on when you should call 911. If you are in a situation that requires a response from a public safety agency, don't hesitate to call 911 if you think it might be an emergency.

Date: 1/5/16

PROTECTING PETS IN THE WINTER

Winter is a time we should pay close attention to the safety of our pets. Here are some safety tips to follow:

  • Pets that live outdoors should be fed a bit more in the winter because they need the extra calories to stay warm. They also should have fresh water put out a couple of times a day, or consider a special bowl that prevents the water from freezing.
  • If your pet goes outdoors, be aware of the temperature. Pets can get frostbite very easily on the ears, tail and paws.
  • When walking your dog in freezing conditions, check the paws to make sure that ice is not building up between the toes and that salt or gravel from the roads is not irritating the skin.
  • If your dog is a swimmer, keep it on a leash around open water or unstable ice. Hypothermia can set in quickly and the dog may be unable to get out of the water.
  • Before you start your car, ensure no animals have decided to nap in a warm spot under the hood of the vehicle.
  • If decorating for the holidays, keep ornaments out of the reach of your pets. Remember that poinsettias, holly, mistletoe and other plants can be toxic if ingested.
  • Ingesting anti-freeze can be fatal for your dog or cat. It has a sweet taste and even a tiny amount can cause severe kidney damage and even death. If you spill anti-freeze, soak it up immediately. (Clay kitty litter works well and discard the litter once the anti-freeze has been absorbed.)
  • All outdoor pets should have access to shelter from the elements.

Please remember, if it is too cold for you to be comfortable outside it is too cold for our pets also.

Date: 11/16/15

CYBER-BULLYING AND YOUR CHILDREN

Bullies are nothing new, but Internet accessibility has given rise to another type of bully. It has created cyber-bullies who bully others via electronic devices. Cyber-bullies use e-mail, instant messages, blogs, chat rooms, and social networking sites as well as cell phone text messages, and photos to harass their victims.

Cyber-bullies utilize the Internet for the following:

  • Send insulting messages
  • Spread rumors
  • Post embarrassing photos
  • Pose as someone else and send messages supposedly from the victim
  • Share someone's secrets online
  • Threaten the victim and make him or her live in fear
  • Exclude their victim from an online group

Who is affected by cyber-bullying?

Middle-school and high-school aged youngsters are the most likely to be affected. Your child may be a victim and not tell you. Or, your child may be a cyber-bully.

Why do kids cyber-bully?

Children become cyber-bullies for the same reasons they bully in person. It makes them feel important. But unlike bullies, cyber-bullies can hide behind anonymity on the computer and be just as mean or meaner to others.

What are the dangers of cyber-bullying?

Victims of cyber-bullying can get so upset and/or depressed that they attempt suicide or hurt others. While bullies may threaten children at school, cyber-bullies "invade" your home so that there's no escape from them. Hurtful messages or pictures can be e- mailed, posted online or forwarded via cell phones, making the bullying widespread and long lasting.

What are some warning signs a child is being cyber-bullied?

Warning signs may include; unexplained anxiety, anger, sadness, or fear, especially after using the computer of cell phone. Falling grades, lack of interest in friends, school or other activities, trouble sleeping, more or less interest in the computer or cell phone.

What can parents and guardians do about cyber-bullies?

  • Talk to your children. Tell them to let you know if anyone is being a cyber-bully. If someone is, have your child save all communications from that person, including e-mails, Internet Messages (IMs), and text messages.
  • Report incidents to the Internet or Cell Phone provider, your child's school, parents of the bully and/or police if you fear your child is in danger.
  • Find out how to block the cyber-bully's e-mail address or phone number, or change your child's online information.
  • Note that filtering software cannot prevent cyber-bullying.

What can your children do?

  • If one of your children receives a hurtful message, he or she needs to tell you about it, but not send a message back. Responding negatively to the cyber-bully, or forwarding the hurtful message on to others, makes your child a cyber-bully as well.
  • Avoid websites where cyber-bullying occurs.
  • To keep others from being hurt, your children should report any instances of someone they know being cyber-bullied.

Date: 10/14/15

HALLOWEEN SAFETY TIPS

Please teach your children to cross the street at corners, using traffic signals and crosswalks. Look both ways when crossing the street and keep looking as you cross. Put electronic devices down and keep your head up and walk, don't run, across the street. Make eye contact with drivers before crossing in front of them. Always walk on sidewalks or paths. If there are no sidewalks, walk facing traffic as far to the left as possible. Children should walk on direct routes with the fewest street crossings. Watch for cars that are turning or backing up. Teach children to never dart out into the street or cross between parked cars.

Decorate costumes and bags with reflective tape or stickers and, if possible, choose light colors. Have kids carry glow sticks or flashlights to help them see and be seen by drivers. Children under the age of 12 should not be without adult supervision. If kids are mature enough to be out without supervision, they should stick to familiar areas that are well lit and trick-or-treat in groups. You should always know where your child is going to be.

You should check your children's candy for any evidence of tampering and avoid eating homemade treats from strangers.

Teach your child to never go into a stranger's house. There are some people in life that aren't very nice to kids and you have to be careful. You can check for convicted sex offenders in your area by going to the Laramie County Sheriff's Office website and clicking on the Offender Watch icon on the left side of the page or you can copy and paste this link. http://sheriffalerts.com/cap_main.php?office=55437

Anyone who is going to be out driving on Halloween should slow down and be especially alert in residential neighborhoods. Children are excited on Halloween and may move in unpredictable ways.

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to wish everyone a safe and happy Halloween.

Date: 10/7/15

WINTER DRIVING

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to share with you a link to WYDOT's "Winter Wheelin'" pamphlet.

Click here to view

Date: 9/11/15

SCHOOL BUS SAFETY

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to remind drivers of their responsibility to stop for school buses displaying red flashing lights. Because buses are large vehicles, the level of difficulty to see around increases. The outcome of illegally passing a stopped school bus is potentially devastating for children and drivers. Law enforcement agencies continue to receive reports of motorists failing to stop for school buses from bus drivers and other citizens each year.

Wyoming law requires motorists to stop whenever the red lights on a school bus are flashing regardless of the direction you are traveling. The law applies to any roadway with two or more lanes of traffic, including multi-lane highways such as South Greeley Highway. The only exception to the law is for divided highways with two roads separated by an unpaved median strip or barrier. In this case, only drivers on the same side of the road as the bus must stop. A painted median strip or a center lane used only for left turns does not create two separate lanes. Where this situation exists, all lanes of traffic must stop. When a bus is flashing amber lights, motorists should prepare to stop. When the red lights begin to flash, motorists traveling in both directions must stop before reaching the bus and must remain stopped until the red lights are turned off.

Please do your part to make our roads safe.

Date: 9/1/15

GUN SAFETY

With hunting season just around the corner, the Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to share with you the NRA page on gun safety. http://training.nra.org/nra-gun-safety-rules.aspx

Date: 8/26/15

BACK TO SCHOOL SAFETY

We would like to share with you a link to the American Academy of Pediatrics website. This link will take you to a page on back to school safety.

Click here to view

Date: 8/20/15

FIRE SAFETY

We know that fires frequently occur, and yet no one seems to think they will be the victim of a fire. However, hundreds of people are affected by fire every year in this country. There are some precautions we can all take to reduce the risk of our becoming the victim of a fire.

Protect your home from fire

  • Create a 30-foot non-combustible defensible space around your home.
  • Stack firewood away from the home.
  • Clean your chimneys on a regular basis.
  • Use caution when using heat lamps or space heaters. Ensure that they cannot come into contact with anything combustible.
  • Be sure to unplug curling irons and turn off stove burners when not in use.
  • Trim branches along driveways so that they are 14 feet off the ground, 14 feet from other surfaces and 10 feet from the roof and power lines.
  • Keep gutters free from debris and screen vents under eaves and decks.
  • Keep yards watered and mowed.
  • Plant low-growing, less-flammable plants near homes.
  • Post your address in a location that is visible from all directions for at least 150 feet.
  • Store your flammables in a safe location away from any ignition source.

Campfires

  • Call before you go. Call your local forestry or fire district to learn if there any current campfire restrictions.
  • Use maintained campgrounds with established fire pits. If campfires are allowed outside campgrounds, avoid areas near your tent, structures, vehicles, shrubs and trees, and be aware of low-hanging branches overhead.
  • Clear the site down to soil, at least five feet on all sides, and circle your campfire site with rocks.
  • Keep your campfire small.
  • NEVER use gasoline to build a campfire.
  • Always have water and fire tools on site. Have a shovel and a bucket of water nearby to extinguish any escaped embers.
  • Remember when you leave drown all embers with water, stir the coals and drown again until it is DEAD OUT.

Date: 7/7/15

GIVING TO A CHARITY

To avoid being taken advantage of, research the organization you are considering making a donation to.

Charity Scam

Avoid any charity or fundraiser that:

  • Refuses to provide detailed information about its identity, mission, costs, and how the donation will be used.
  • Won't provide you their tax ID number.
  • Uses a name that closely resembles that of a better-known, reputable organization.
  • Thanks you for a pledge you don't remember making.
  • Uses high-pressure tactics like trying to get you to donate immediately, without giving you time to think about it and do your research.
  • Asks for donations in cash or asks you to wire money. Never wire money to someone claiming to be a charity. Scammers often request donations to be wired because wiring money is like sending cash: once you send it, you can't get it back.
  • Do not provide your credit or check card number, bank account number or any personal information until you've thoroughly researched the charity.
  • Offers to send a courier or overnight delivery service to collect the donation immediately.
  • If a donation request comes from a group claiming to help your local community (for example, local police or firefighters), ask the local agency if they have heard of the group and are getting financial support.
  • Guarantees sweepstakes winnings in exchange for a contribution. By law, you never have to give a donation to be eligible to win a sweepstakes.

Charity Checklist

Be sure your donation benefits the people and organizations you want to help.

  • Get the name, address, and telephone number of the charity.
  • Research the name of the organization online.
  • Call the charity and ask how much will go to the actual cause to which you're donating.
  • Find out if the charity or fundraiser must be registered in your state by contacting the National Association of State Charity Officials.
  • There are several sites on the internet that offer information on charities.(Charity Navigator, Charity Watch, or GuideStar)
  • Keep a record of your donations.
  • Visit this Internal Revenue Service (IRS) webpage to find out which organizations are eligible to receive tax deductible contributions. Some organizations may not have to pay taxes. They are Tax exempt, but may not be able to receive tax deductible donations.
  • Never send cash donations.

Date: 7/1/15

KEEPING KIDS SAFE DURING THE SUMMER

Summer is a great time to enjoy outdoor activities. Here are some ways to keep your kids safe and healthy while they enjoy the summer fun.

Heat Injury Prevention

Heat-related illness happens when the body's temperature control system is overloaded. Infants and children up to 4 years of age are at greatest risk. Anyone can get sick from the heat if they participate in strenuous physical activities during hot weather.

  • Never leave infants, children, or pets in a parked car, even if the windows are cracked open.
  • Dress infants and children in loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Schedule outdoor activities carefully, for morning and evening hours.
  • Stay cool with cool showers or baths.
  • Seek immediate medical care if you or your child has systems of heat related illness.
  • Just a few serious sunburns can increase you and your child's risk of skin cancer later in life. Their skin needs protection from the sun's harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays whenever they're outdoors.
  • Cover up. Clothing that covers your and your child's skin helps protect against UV rays.
  • Use sunscreen with at least SPF (sun protection factor) 15 and UVA (ultraviolet A) and UVB (ultraviolet B) protection every time you and your child go outside.

Insects

Protect yourself and your family by preventing bites and diseases, like West Nile virus and Lyme disease, which can be transmitted by insects.

  • Use insect repellant while playing outdoors.
  • Check yourself and your children for ticks.

Water Safety

Water-related activities are popular during the warm months, but keep in mind that drowning is the leading cause of injury death for children ages 1 to 4. Three children die every day as a result of drowning.

  • Always supervise children when in or around water.
  • Teach kids to swim.
  • Learn CPR. Your CPR skills could save someone's life, maybe even your own child's.
  • Install a fence around home pools.
  • When boating always wear a properly fitted life jacket when you and your loved ones are on the water.

Injury Prevention

Each year in the United States, emergency departments treat more than 200,000 children ages 14 and younger for playground-related injuries. Falls at home and on the playground are a common cause of injury.

  • Check to make sure that the surfaces under playground equipment are safe, soft, and well-maintained.
  • Supervise young children at all times around fall hazards, such as stairs and playground equipment.
  • Use stair gates, to protect little ones from taking a dangerous tumble.
  • Make sure kids and teens wear the right protective equipment for their sport or recreation activity.
  • Supervise your children in all their activities.

Date: 6/24/15

BOATING SAFETY

Now that summer is finally here, more people will be pulling out their boats from winter storage in preparation for launch in the waters of this state. Below are suggestions which can contribute to your safety and add to your boating pleasure.

  • Know the legal requirements for your size vessel. Safety equipment must be accessible and in working condition.
  • Wear your life jackets!! 85% of the boating fatalities could be avoided by wearing a personal floatation device. Remember it won't save your life if you don't wear it.
  • Have children and non-swimmers wear a personal floatation device. Each device should be of suitable size for the intended wearer and fit securely. 90% of those who die in boating accidents drown.
  • Be prepared and carry extra equipment such as a bailer (bucket), anchor, first aid kit, visual distress signal, tool kit, flashlight with extra batteries, and a cell phone.
  • Don't over load your boat. Follow the recommendations on the capacity plate of your boat.
  • Capsizing, sinking, and falling overboard account for 70% of boating fatalities.
  • If your boat should capsize, your best chance for survival and rescue is to stay with the boat. Pull as much of your body out of the water as possible to preserve body warmth.
  • Hypothermia can be a killer; keep your body dry and warm as possible.
  • It is illegal to operate any boat while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. Use a designated driver.
  • Stressors such as exposure to sun, wind, cold water, vibration, noise, and alcohol all affect your ability to react.
  • Don't run out of fuel. Practice the 1/3 rule: 1/3 for trip, 1/3 for return, and 1/3 for spare.
  • Fuel vapors are heavier then air and collect in the bilge. Never fill gasoline cans in the boat.
  • When anchoring, use a line that is several times longer than the depth of the water and never anchor by the stern.
  • File a float plan. Let someone know where you're boating and when you'll be back.
  • You're responsible for damage or injury caused by your wake. Exercise caution around other boaters and docks.

For further information on boating in Wyoming, people are encouraged to contact Wyoming Game and Fish.

Date: 6/17/15

SUMMER CRIME PREVENTION TIPS

Summer brings warmer weather, longer days and, unfortunately, an increase in burglaries and thefts. To help eliminate or reduce the occurrence of these crimes we ask you to consider the following suggestions.

Keep vehicles locked with the windows up at all times when parked at your home. Remove all valuables including purses, cell phones, MP3 players, GPS systems, laptop computers, DVD players, gym bags, briefcases etc. If you have to leave valuables in your vehicle, hide them. Put them in your trunk or under a seat.

Avoid Home Improvement scams. Beware of anyone offering to perform an unscheduled home repair or asking to gain entry into your home. Ask for identification, contact the company they say they work for to verify employment. Never agree to pay for home improvement services until the work has been completed. Don't sign home improvement contracts without reading the entire contract carefully and discussing anything that doesn't seem clear with the company and trusted family members.

Keep doors closed and locked. This includes garages, sheds and patio doors. Burglaries from open garages, sheds and residences are more prevalent in summer months.

Unattended bicycles should always be locked to something sturdy. Remember when you stop to rest, eat or use restroom facilities, an unlocked and unattended bike is an invitation to theft.

Vacation plans? Have a trusted neighbor or friend pick up your mail and newspapers. Set inside lights on a timer. Set your home alarm. Have a neighbor keep an eye on your house and make sure to leave a contact phone number for them to reach you in case of an emergency.

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to wish everyone a happy and crime free summer.

Date: 6/11/15

CARING FOR PETS IN THE SUMMER HEAT

The summer heat can be dangerous for livestock, pets and people.

Practice basic summer safety

Never leave your pets in a parked car: On a warm day, temperatures inside a vehicle can rise rapidly to dangerous levels. On an 85-degree day, for example, the temperature inside a car with the windows opened slightly can reach 102 degrees within 10 minutes. After 30 minutes, the temperature will reach 120 degrees. Your pet may suffer irreversible organ damage or die.

When hauling livestock, plan to do your hauling during the cooler parts of the day, avoiding the hours between 11:00 am and 4:00 pm as that is generally the hottest time of day. Haul fewer animals at a time if at all possible. Avoid stopping. If you must stop, park the animals in shade. Make stop durations as short as possible. If possible, plan shorter trips in hotter weather. Ensure the livestock are well hydrated before shipping. Often animals won't drink while in transport, even if drinking water is available. Consider giving animals electrolytes prior to shipping. Make sure your load has plenty of ventilation and airflow. At times when it is especially hot out, not hauling the animals until cooler weather arrives may be the safest idea.

Watch the humidity: Remember that it's not just the ambient temperature but also the humidity that can affect your pet. Animals pant or sweat and as the moisture evaporates it takes heat away from their body. If the humidity is too high the moisture doesn't evaporate as well. They are unable to cool themselves, and their temperature can rise to dangerous levels very quickly.

Limit exercise on hot days: Take care when exercising your pet. Adjust intensity and duration of exercise in accordance with the temperature. On very hot days, limit exercise to early morning or evening hours. Asphalt gets very hot and can burn your pet's paws, so walk your dog on the grass if possible. Always carry water with you to keep your dog from dehydrating.

Provide ample shade and water: Always make sure your pets and livestock have protection from heat and the sun. And always provide plenty of fresh water.

Watch for signs of heatstroke: Extreme temperatures can cause heatstroke.

Some signs of heatstroke in small animals are heavy panting in, glazed eyes, a rapid heartbeat, difficulty breathing, excessive thirst, lethargy, fever, dizziness, lack of coordination, profuse salivation, vomiting, a deep red or purple tongue, seizure, and unconsciousness.

In horses symptoms of heat stroke are dry, hot skin; high pulse (normal pulse rate is 36-42 beats per minute), high respiratory rate and a high temperature.

In cattle the symptoms of heat stroke are mouths opened and breathing hard, showing signs of lethargy with their heads low and well as increased salivation. Affected animals become weak and eventually may be unable to rise.

Animals are at particular risk for heat stroke if they are very old, very young, are overweight, not conditioned to prolonged exercise, or have heart or respiratory disease. Some breeds of dogs and cats with short muzzles will have a harder time breathing and dispelling heat in extreme temperatures.

How to treat an animal suffering from heatstroke: If possible, move your animal into the shade or an air-conditioned area. Apply ice packs or cold towels to their head, neck, and chest or run cool (not cold) water over them. Let them drink small amounts of cool water or lick ice cubes. Take them directly to a veterinarian.

Date: 6/3/15

JURY DUTY SCAM

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office has received complaints in reference to citizens being contacted by phone and told that they missed jury duty by a person identifying themselves as a Laramie County Sheriff's Deputy. Victims are being told that they have a warrant out for their arrest as a result of missing jury duty. To avoid going to jail, you must immediately go purchase a Green Dot card or similar card and give the card number over the phone. We want to again stress that under no circumstances would a member of a law enforcement agency ever solicit any type of payment over the phone.

  • Don't give out any personal identifying information on any unsolicited telephone call. In most cases, courts correspond with potential jurors via the postal service.
  • Ask the caller questions. Ask their name and the exact office where they work. The scammers will usually hang up on you if you start asking questions.
  • Hang up and call the office they are supposed to be with. Use a number that you lookup not the number they give you to call back.
  • Don't rely on Caller ID to verify that the person is calling from a court or law enforcement office. Many times your caller ID will show a local number even though these crimes are usually perpetrated by individuals living outside the United States. These scammers use spoofing programs that disguise their caller ID with a local number they choose.
  • There are numerous scams going around and many resources out there that can help you learn how to protect yourself from fraud. http://www.stopfraud.gov/protect.html

Date: 5/28/15

SAFETY TIPS FOR RUNNERS

Every runner should take a few moments and consider their safety while running. Running is generally a safe activity, but there are still perils worth considering and preparing for.

Before the Run

  • Wear bright clothing.
  • If running at night, carry a flashlight and wear something reflective.
  • Arrange to run with another person. Leave word with someone or write down where you plan to run and when you will return.
  • Carry some I. D. and a cell phone.
  • Don't wear a radio/headset/earphones or anything which distracts you so that you are completely aware of your environment.
  • Avoid deserted streets, lonely trails and especially avoid unlighted routes at night. Vary the route and the time of day that you run.
  • Run in familiar areas.

During the Run

  • Never assume a driver sees you.
  • Even If you have the right of way you should make sure that drivers are stopped and that they see you before you cross in front of a vehicle.
  • Watch for vehicles making turns or pulling out of driveways.
  • Always stay alert. The more aware you are, the less vulnerable you are.
  • Think about possible escape routes in case of confrontation.
  • Know where the nearest public places are with some general activity - there is usually safety in numbers.
  • If something seems suspicious, do not panic, but run in a different direction.
  • Run clear of parked cars, bushes, dark areas.
  • Run against traffic so that you can observe the approach of automobiles.
  • If the same car cruises past you more than once, take down the license number and get out your cell phone. If they do have bad intentions, they will think you are calling Law Enforcement. You can pretend to talk on it or actually call someone.
  • Know where you are and pay attention to street names. That way you can relay your location to dispatch, in case you need help.
  • Use discretion in acknowledging strangers. Be friendly, but keep your distance and keep moving.
  • Do not approach a car to give directions or the time of day. Point toward the nearest police or information source, shrug your shoulders, but keep moving. If you feel you must respond, do it while moving.

If Confronted

  • Run toward populated areas, busy streets and open businesses.
  • Ignore jeers and verbal harassment.
  • Keep moving.
  • Don't panic and don't run toward a more isolated area.
  • Use your cell phone to call Law Enforcement.

Date: 5/21/15

DON'T DRINK AND DRIVE

With the holiday and graduation for many this weekend, The Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to remind everyone to not drink and drive. Every 51 minutes, someone is killed in an alcohol-related crash.

According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) 31 percent of all traffic deaths occurred in crashes in which at least one driver or non-occupant had a BAC of 0.08 percent or more and that some alcohol was present in 40 percent of all fatal crashes and all traffic fatalities.

There are things a person can do if they have been drinking (or know they will be drinking) to prevent themselves from driving while intoxicated. These things include:

  • Call a cab.
  • If the destination is nearby, have a sober friend walk you home.
  • Have a designated driver before drinking. Give them the keys before drinking.

Don't let your friends drive if they have been drinking.

  • Call them a cab.
  • Talk them into giving you their keys.
  • Call a parent or sober friend to come pick them up.
  • Be the designated driver or arrange for someone to be the designated driver.

The "Wyoming Governor's Council on Impaired Driving", has created an easy to use, mobile application giving people, who have been drinking, a safe option other than driving. Now with a simple push of a button on your smartphone, you can find a sober ride home and keep our roads safe. And it is free!

Choosing to drive after drinking is a dangerous and costly decision. Besides risking an accident and injuring or killing yourself, you endanger everyone else on the road. Consider the financial cost of getting caught driving while impaired. Your first offense can cost you more than $10,000 and will change your life. You will go to jail, you could lose your job, you will pay higher insurance premiums and you will have to live with the label of "drunk driver". It simply isn't worth it.

Download the Drive Sober Wyoming app for free and use it. Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over! http://drivesoberwy.com/

No one should drive after drinking. They put others at risk every time they get behind the wheel of a car. Never get into a vehicle with someone that has been drinking. If you don't drink and drive or if you prevent someone from drinking and driving, you just might save a life.

Date: 5/12/15

MOTORCYCLE SAFETY FOR RIDERS AND MOTORISTS

The popularity of motorcycling has grown over the years with more than 9.4 million registered motorcycles on the road as of 2012, the latest figures available.

Since 1997, the rising number of riders has resulted in an increase in motorcyclist deaths. In 2012, 4,957 motorcyclists were killed, an increase from the 4,612 motorcyclist fatalities in 2011. Per vehicle mile traveled, a motorcyclist is approximately 26 times more likely to die in a crash than someone riding in a passenger car.

The most recent data for injuries sustained from a motorcycle crash is from 2012 at approximately 93,000, which are up from 2011's 81,000. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), motorcycle crashes account for more than 15% of motor vehicle deaths even though motorcycles only make up 3% of motor vehicle registrations in the country.

Motorcyclists come from all walks of life, work in all occupations, and represent all age ranges. With the popularity of motorcycles as a mode of transportation, if you are an employer, chances are some of your employees own a motorcycle, whether for commuting to and from work or for recreation. Help keep motorcyclists safe on the road by promoting motorcycle safety to your employees who ride and to motorists who share the road with motorcycles.

Please remember "Look twice, save a life". Everyone on the road is someone's son or daughter, drive with the care you would want others to drive around your loved one.

Download the NHTSA Motorcycle Safety Tips on line at www.nhtsa.gov.

Date: 5/5/15

IDENTITY THEFT

Identity theft continues to be a growing problem costing us billions of dollars every year in personal losses, investigations, and increased financial institution fees.

Criminals can obtain personal information from places of business, your tech devices and even your own home. "Dumpster divers" pick up information you may have thrown away, such as utility bills, credit card slips, magazines, credit card solicitations, and other documents. Thieves will even take mail out of your mailbox before you have a chance to pick it up.

Don't throw anything away that contains your name and address. Take everything from your Post Office box to your home or office. You should shred all documents, including pre-approved credit applications received in your name, insurance forms, bank checks and statements you are discarding, and other financial information. Magazine and newspaper labels with your name and address should be shred as well. A crosscut shredder is best, but for those with strip shredders, adding water to the strips of paper in a plastic bag and mixing it up will damage the paper and prevent anyone from taping the strips together.

Pick up your mail as soon as possible from your mailbox. If you are going to be out of town, have the post office hold your mail until you return.

Don't put your social security number on your checks or your credit receipts. If a business requests your social security number, give them an alternate number and explain why. If a government agency requests your social security number, there must be a privacy notice accompanying the request.

Make a list of all your credit card account numbers and bank account numbers with customer service phone numbers and keep it in a safe place.

When you order new credit cards in the mail or previous ones have expired, watch the calendar to make sure you get the card within the appropriate time. If the card is not received within that time, call the credit card grantor immediately to find out if the card has been sent. If you don't receive the card, check to make sure a change of address was not filed.

Pay attention to your billing cycles. Follow up with creditors if bills don't arrive on time. A missing credit card bill could mean an identity thief has taken over your credit card account and changed your billing address.

Reconcile all of your bank accounts and regularly check your accounts online to confirm account activity. You are able to obtain a free credit check from each of the three credit bureau service each year; Equifax, Transunion, and Experian. An easy way to accomplish this is online at www.annualcreditreport.com or call the toll free number 1-877-322-8228 to request a report.

It is suggested that you request a free credit report every four months from one of the three credit bureau services.

Please guard your identity. It could take years to recover from just one incident of identity theft.

Date: 4/30/15

SHARING THE ROAD: CYCliSTS AND MOTORISTS

It's the time of year when we start to see more bicycles on the road. More people are using bicycles as a means to commute, for entertainment and for exercise.

Motorists should remember when sharing the road with a cyclist:

  • A bicycle is considered by law to be a vehicle. When a cyclist has stopped and remains astride their bicycle at an intersection and/or for a traffic signal, they are to be treated as a vehicle waiting for their turn to proceed.
  • Many children riding bicycles on the street may lack the necessary training and skills for safe cycling. They may not be aware of all dangers.
  • Be alert for small children on oversized bicycles. This may increase the likelihood for loss of control.
  • When passing a cyclist, go around them like you would any other vehicle. Leave lots of room.
  • When you are preparing to make a right turn, watch for cyclists who may pull up alongside your vehicle. Remember to shoulder-check your blind spots.
  • When you are about to make a right turn, do not pull up beside a cyclist and then turn directly in front of them and cut them off.
  • When pulling away from the curb, always check for cyclists who may be trying to pass you.
  • When parked at the curb, always check for cyclists before you open your vehicle door. It's the driver's responsibility not to open the vehicle door into traffic.
  • Do not follow too close behind cyclists. They do not have brake lights to warn you when they are stopping.
  • Cyclists are entitled to make left turns in the same manner as motorists. Since they are more exposed to traffic on left turns, they will need extra consideration, especially on multi-lane roads.
  • Cyclists are required to ride as close as practicable to the curb, however they may need to ride further out when they have to steer away from drainage grates, pot holes, debris, loose gravel or sand, wet or slippery surfaces, rutted or grooved pavement and even dogs. Be aware of the roadway conditions that may affect a cyclist.
  • Do not sound your horn unnecessarily when you are overtaking a cyclist. It may startle them and cause them to lose control. If you feel that you must use your horn, tap it quickly and lightly while you are still some distance away from the cyclist.

Cyclists should also remember that, when they are riding their bicycles on streets and highways, they are considered by law to be a vehicle. Therefore they are required to obey all the rules of the road, which apply to other (motorized) vehicles, plus those that apply only to bicycle operators.

Cyclists using the streets and highways should:

  • Never ride against traffic. It is one of the leading causes of crashes, accounting for 15% to 20% of all crashes with cars.
  • Keep both hands on the handlebars except when making a hand signal.
  • Keep both feet on the pedals.
  • Not carry more people at one time than the bicycle was designed for.
  • Not hold onto, attach themselves, or attach the bicycle to any other moving vehicle.
  • Only ride side by side on the road with another cyclist when it does not impede other traffic. If traffic doesn't have enough room to pass you safely, ride single file.
  • Ensure the bicycle is equipped with at least one white light to the front and a red light and or red reflector mounted on the rear of the bicycle when riding between sunset and sunrise.
  • Ensure the bicycle has effective brakes.

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to remind everyone to be safe and courteous.

Date: 4/20/15

VEHICLE WINDSHIELDS-DON'T DRIVE IN THE FOG

Every year, usually in the winter, motorists who are in a hurry can be seen driving while their windshield is foggy. Is saving a few minutes' worth a crashed car or someone's life? When the weather turns colder it can cause moisture to form on the inside of your vehicle's windows or frost on the outside of the windows. It's imperative that the windshield be cleared of any obstructing fog or frost before you drive. Most of us are guilty of not planning for extra "defroster" time in the driveway before we have to leave in the morning. So what can we do?

  • When you can, park your vehicle in the garage or in a carport on cold evenings or when temperatures are expected to drop into the 30's. If you don't have a vehicle enclosure available, use a car cover to cover up your vehicle. This will help to keep the neighborhood cats from leaving cat prints on your car as well.
  • Keep the inside of your vehicle windows clean. Condensing moisture prefers to adhere to small particles on the windshield. An absence of the particles on your windshield will help to lessen the amount of moisture that builds up overnight. A clean windshield also defrosts more quickly.
  • Be patient. Defrosting the window and waiting for the fog to disappear only takes a few minutes. Choosing to drive before you can see through your windshield can result in being issued a citation for Obstruction of Vehicle Windshield, Operating an Unsafe Vehicle, or Careless Driving. There are more severe consequences to driving a vehicle with a foggy windshield as evidenced every year in traffic collisions related to a foggy windshield. Collisions such as vehicles crossing over the centerline and striking oncoming cars, vehicles drifting off the roadway or into parked cars, and vehicles striking pedestrians walking along the roadside.

Be a safe and patient driver. It's the way to go!

Date: 3/31/15

SUICIDE PREVENTION

Suicide is the act or an instance of taking one's own life voluntarily and intentionally. In the United States, tens of thousands of Americans take their own lives every year. These are only the "successful" attempts. This article is about discussing suicide. It may make us uncomfortable, but it can save lives.

Suicide is a tragic permanent act to what is often a temporary problem. Those who actually attempt suicide have lost hope. They no longer believe they can solve their problems or ease their pain and see suicide as their only answer.

Signs and Symptoms of Depression: It's normal for people to experience any one or more of these symptoms. However, experts suggest that concern should be raised when the behavior lasts for more than two weeks. A person experiencing a chronic symptom(s) may not realize they need help. Family, friends, and co-workers should intervene and ensure assistance is obtained.

  • Insomnia
  • Excessive sleeping, daily fatigue, loss of energy
  • Headache, stomachache
  • Changes in appetite and weight
  • Weakness, dizziness
  • Changes in personal appearance, attitude or personality
  • Difficulty concentrating or making decisions
  • Unwillingness to communicate
  • Frequent use of alcohol or other drugs
  • Depression, moodiness
  • Loss of interest in activities
  • Spending time alone
  • Running away from home
  • Aggression, violence, emotional outburst
  • Constant complaints of minor aches and pains
  • Giving away possessions
  • Participating in risk-taking or self-destructive behavior
  • Talk of suicide

Psychological Signs

  • Lack of self,esteem, self-worth
  • Feelings of worthlessness
  • Depression, irritability
  • Feelings of inappropriate guilt
  • Feelings of hopelessness, inner turmoil
  • Feeling that most things are overwhelmingly difficult
  • Feelings of isolation (with family and friends)
  • Inability to maintain a close relationship
  • Inability to resolve problems
  • Inability to accept the loss of death of a loved one
  • Lack of emotional balance
  • Recurrent thoughts of death and suicide

What To Do: Always take anyone, even children, seriously if they talk about suicide. Talking about suicide is the first visible sign and should never be shrugged off as a need for attention. Suicide is serious and often preventable if the behaviors are recognized.

  • Ask directly. "Are you thinking about killing yourself?" This doesn't mean you are encouraging the action; rather you are willing to listen and help.
  • Talk about it. Ask for details if you think that plans have already been made.
  • Be a good listener. Listen with eyes as well as ears; look for nonverbal signs such as hand motions, facial expressions, and moods. Never act shocked, disgusted or make moral judgments.
  • Avoid giving advice. Try not to provide solutions or tell the person to "stop letting things bother you so much," "not to feel that way" or "how lucky they are." Listen; do not give opinions.
  • Show that you are there to listen. Reassure the person that people care about what happens to him or her. Show unconditional love.
  • Seek professional help. A suicidal person needs professional advice and counseling. Breaking confidences is not disloyal, especially if it saves someone's life.
  • Avoid leaving the person alone, especially if there is any immediate danger.
  • Suicide-proof the house by locking away guns and ammunition separately, storing pills securely or properly disposing of them.

If you discover someone who has attempted suicide, treat the situation as a medical emergency and get help immediately. If you suspect a person is in crisis, call the National Suicide Prevention Hotline at 1-800-273-8255. Local resources and support groups include:

Grace for 2 Brothers at 307-432-4049

Cheyenne Regional Medical Center Behavioral Health Outreach at 307-633-7073

Peak Wellness at 307-637-3953

Date: 3/24/15

RUN, HIDE, FIGHT

It has been over two years since the tragedies at the Clackamas Town Center and Sandy Hook school in Connecticut. While the discussion of why such events have occurred continues, it is important for our citizens to know what to do should they find themselves in an active-shooter event.

A review of the shooting incidents over the last decade in this country revealed that a significant number of these events occurred in the workplace. Many of these incidents were the result of the loss of significant relationships, changes in financial status, loss of a job, changes in living arrangements, major adverse changes to life circumstances, and/or feelings of humiliation or rejection on the part of the shooter.

To increase your own safety you need to have a plan. Should something occur in a business or public place remembering three words can make the difference in your survival - RUN, HIDE, FIGHT.

If an active-shooter presents themself, a person should:

  • RUN, if that is possible.
  • HIDE, if running is not possible. Workers should identify hiding places within their work environment. It could be as simple as hiding in a room or closet that is lockable from the inside and remaining quiet.
  • FIGHT, if running or hiding is not possible. Quickly developing a plan to attack the shooter should they enter the space where you are hiding. Using whatever devices are at your disposal, such as a fire extinguisher, chair, office equipment, or other article capable of temporarily stunning or otherwise disabling the shooter.

Remember- The shooter has already decided to kill people.You may literally have to fight for your life. Workplace plans should be developed. Employees should practice using escape routes and hiding. Employees should also identify what articles are available to them that will make an effective weapon for defense. Your chances of survival increase if you are mentally prepared should you find yourself in an active-shooter event.

The City of Houston produced a video on this topic that can be seen on YouTube. The U.S. Department of Homeland Security also has information on their website.

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office would like to encourage everyone to be prepared, plan ahead and be safe.

Date: 3/17/15

RESIDENTIAL BURGLARY PREVENTION

No one wants to be a victim of burglary; it's a traumatic and distressing experience. Most burglaries occur when the residence is not occupied. Listed below are some suggestions from the Laramie County Sheriff's Office to help protect your home and property:

  • Lock all doors and windows.
  • Use motion activated lights for the exterior of your home.
  • Consider getting a video recording system for your home. Video quality has improved within the last several years and the cost associated with such equipment has been reduced to an affordable rate.
  • Install a motion activated "game" camera in an inconspicuous location (Tree, Shrub etc.) on your property. If the camera is directed toward the driveway, a suspect vehicle description with license plate could be obtained.
  • Look into getting an audible alarm system. An audible alarm being activated during a burglary in progress could be the difference of a suspect being inside your home for a few hours versus a few seconds.
  • Having dogs at your residence can greatly reduce your chances of being burglarized. A burglar will most likely choose a house without a dog due to a better chance of not being detected or attacked.
  • Record the make, model, and serial numbers of your valuables. This will assist the Sheriff's Office in recovering your property.
  • Engrave an identifying mark or number on valuable tools, electronics, etc. Avoid using your driver's license or social security number. Often times, Patrol Deputies encounter suspected stolen property, but without a serial number or identifying marks it becomes difficult to determine what items are linked to a burglary victim.
  • Keep photographs of items of value in a secure location. In the unfortunate event of a burglary, photos can aid law enforcement when recovering suspected stolen property.
  • Keep all firearms and valuable jewelry in a safe that is bolted to the floor or studded wall. Typical burglars usually like to take items without much effort.

The Laramie County Sheriff's Office encourages all of our citizens to employ some or all of these prevention techniques to help reduce criminal activity, aid in identification of suspect(s), and to help recover stolen property.

Date: 3/10/15

On the Road with Pets

There are several things to consider when traveling with pets. Safety is number one. Your Laramie County Sheriff's Office offers the following tips:

  • Consider acquiring a barrier to separate your pet from your passengers, and especially you the driver. There are many different designs available, such as metal gates, back seat hammocks, and fabric partitions.
  • Safety belts systems for your pet? You bet. There are now harnesses and truck tethers available for your dog. A properly restrained dog helps prevent interference with the driver and reduces injury to your pet and passengers by preventing your pet from being tossed around in the vehicle should a crash occur.
  • When taking a lengthy road trip, stop every two to three hours to allow your pet some exercise. They will travel better, which means the trip will be less stressful and safer.
  • Water and ventilation is crucial, but it is not recommended to feed your pet prior to a long road trip.
  • Ensure that the destination of your travel is pet friendly.
  • Do not leave your pets in the vehicle unattended. On warm days, even with the windows cracked open, temperatures inside of vehicles can quickly rise to dangerous levels. Our K-9 units have a temperature alarm system that helps to insure the animal's safety.

Date: 3/3/15

WE MUST WORK TOGETHER

This week's tip is based on a principle from Sir Robert Peel's "Nine Principles of Policing". Sir Robert Peel established the London Metropolitan Police, which claims to be the first organized paid police force in the English-speaking world. Police officers in England are still referred to as "Bobbies" in reference to Sir Robert Peel. In 1822 he wrote the "Nine Principles of Policing".

Principle Number Seven: "To maintain at all times a relationship with the public that gives reality to the historic tradition that the police are the public and that the public are the police, the police being only members of the public who are paid to give full time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen in the interests of community welfare and existence."

Sir Robert Peel's seventh principle still has great importance 185 years after it was written. It should serve to remind us that every citizen has a responsibility to our community. There would be many crimes left unsolved without the assistance of citizens coming forward with information. Your Sheriff's Office also needs everyone to be great witnesses when necessary and never fear coming forward with information that may solve a crime or prevent a crime from occurring.

Your Sheriff's Office continues to work very hard to earn your trust. We've received a large amount of feedback telling us we are doing just that and if we're not, we'd like to hear about that as well. If you're afraid to report something for whatever reason, call and speak to a deputy. If you want your name to be kept confidential, ask the deputy if that would be possible. In many cases we can use the information without identifying you.

Together, we can keep our community safe.

Date: 2/24/15

INTERNET CRIMES AGAINST CHILDREN

The Internet is a very useful and entertaining tool to many millions of people around the world, but it can also be very harmful. There are people who are constantly looking for ways to harm others by stealing our identity, defrauding us, destroying our computer files, and even exploiting and harming our children.

The risks to our children include exposure to inappropriate material, sexual solicitation, harassment and bullying. Parents need to be involved and remain vigilant to protect their children.

Red flags to watch for include your child:

  • Changing or minimizing the screen when you walk into the room.
  • Receiving strange phone calls from people you don't know.
  • Wearing new clothes, CDs or other items from unknown sources.
  • Becomes overly upset if Internet access is restricted or unavailable for even a short period of time.
  • Is usually withdrawn.

The following tips are offered to reduce the risk of your child being harmed because of the Internet.

  • Develop rules for Internet use to include what sites they can visit, who they can talk to online, how long they can be online, and where they can use a computer.
  • Never give out personal information.
  • Keep the computer in a common room in the home such as the family room. Not in a bedroom.
  • Periodically review your child's e-mail account. Find out what websites they have visited by checking the "history" folder of your Internet browser. Visit these sites to see what they offer.
  • If the "history" is clear, this is a red flag that your child doesn't want you to know where they have been.
  • Become computer literate, including learning chatroom lingo.
  • Find out if your Internet Service Provider (ISP) offers filters and learn how to use them.
  • There are also commercially available software programs designed to help parents monitor their child's computer activities.
  • Do not allow your child to respond to messages or bulletin board items that are sexually suggestive, obscene, or threatening. Forward a copy of such messages to your ISP.
  • Never allow you child to arrange an in-person meeting with someone they met online without your permission. In person meetings should occur in public places and the parent should accompany their child.
  • Never send pictures of yourself online. Once this has occurred, the picture can be posted all over the Internet and there is no way for police or anyone else to remove it from the Internet.

Please report any suspected Internet crime to your Sheriff's Office or other local law enforcement agency.

Date: 2/17/15

DRIVING TIPS FOR PREGNANT WOMEN

Compared to the average motorist, pregnant women face additional safety concerns when riding in motor vehicles. A frequent question is whether they can ride safely in front of air bags. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration and the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecologists recommend that pregnant women wear a three-point safety belt and do not disconnect the air bag.

  • Always position the lap belt portion as low on the abdomen as possible. The shoulder belt should be routed over the sternum.
  • Leave the air bag operational.
  • Drive a vehicle that allows the most clearance between the steering wheel and abdomen. Airbags have a 10-inch tether and safety belts, when fitted properly, can allow up to two inches of stretch in a severe crash. Ensure that there is at least 12 inches between the source of the airbag and the vehicle occupant.
  • Remove or adjust coats to make sure they do not interfere with low placement of the lap belt.
  • Minimize driving in hazardous conditions, such as in bad weather or on icy roads.
  • Position the steering wheel to maximize abdomen-to-wheel clearance, while aiming it more toward the chest than the head.
  • When possible, ride as a passenger rather than drive to avoid potential contact with the steering wheel. Passenger seats can often be adjusted further back to ensure that the airbag is fully deployed prior to occupant impact with the airbag.
  • And remember: Buckle up - It's the way to go!

    02/10/15

    VACATION CRIME PREVENTION

    Before leaving

    • Have good locks on all doors and windows and USE THEM.
    • Record the serial numbers on your valuables or engrave them with your driver's license number.
    • Never leave your house key hidden outside under a doormat, in a flowerpot, on a door ledge, etc.
    • Make your house appear "lived in." Use timers for lights and radios. Have a neighbor or friend pick up mail, packages, and newspapers, and keep the lawn mowed and watered.
    • Leave your trip plans and an emergency phone number with a neighbor or friend.

    While on the road

    • Use credit cards or traveler's checks instead of carrying large amounts of cash. Don't openly display your cash.
    • Keep a record of traveler's check numbers and credit card numbers in a safe place. Have the phone numbers available to contact the companies involved if your checks or cards are lost or stolen.
    • Be aware of your surroundings. Never discuss the amount of cash you're carrying or your travel plans with strangers.
    • If you suspect someone is following you, use your cell phone or drive to the nearest business and call the local police. If you think it is unsafe to get out of your car, sound your horn and flash your lights to draw attention.
    • If your car breaks down, raise the hood and attach a white handkerchief to the antenna, and use your cell phone to call the police or a garage. If you don't have a cell phone and someone stops to help, stay in your locked car and ask the person to call the police or a garage. If you must abandon your car, keep all passengers together.

    Arriving at a Hotel

    • Park your vehicle in a well-lit area close to the lobby where you can see your vehicle and occupants.
    • Before getting out of your vehicle, check your surroundings for suspicious looking people.
    • When leaving your vehicle, place valuables out of sight and be sure to lock it.
    • Memorize or record your vehicle license information on a piece of paper so you don't have to go back outside.
    • Make reservations ahead of time to prevent being stranded with no vacancies or unsafe accommodations.
    • Store valuables in a hotel safe and get a receipt instead of leaving them in your vehicle.
    • Don't enter your room if someone is loitering in the area and watching you. Report this to the front desk immediately.
    • Be sure the locks on your door are working properly.
    • Familiarize yourself with the closest fire evacuation route.
    • Make sure you know how to use the phone in your room and that you can dial out to 911.
    • Memorize the name and address of the hotel and your room number.
    • Use the "peep hole" to identify visitors. Do not open the door to strangers.
    • Hang the "do not disturb" sign on the doorknob and leave a light and radio or TV on when leaving.
    • Do not enter an elevator if someone inside seems suspicious.
    • Inquire at the front desk about safe places to eat, shop, walk, or jog. Ask for a map of the area.

    Most of these tips are simply using common sense, so relax and have fun on your vacation.